Review: I, II, & III John (NTL)

3791899Judith M. Lieu is Lady Margaret’s Professor of Divinity at the University of Cambridge in England. Lieu is the current President of the Society of New Testament Studies, as well as the University Gender Equality Champion with special responsibility for Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences. Lieu is the author of numerous books and the Editor of the journal of New Testament Studies.

I, II, & III John: A Commentary is a classic example of the New Testament Library series. The commentary begins with an introduction that covers all three Johannine Epistles and tackles the standard introductory matters with clarity. Lieu is well aligned with the current critical consensus concerning the date and authorship of the epistles, and thus concludes no compositional relationship with the author of the Fourth Gospel.

The commentary proper stands in the top rank of critical commentaries on the Johannine Epistles. Lieu is judicious in her interaction with the text and appears to be well-acquainted with the peripheral issues. Two features deserve mention here. First and foremost, like the other volumes in the NTL series, Lieu provides the reader with an original translation and textual notes. I have stated this many times before and I will state it again, I have continually found this to be one of the most helpful features of the NTL series, and Lieu does not disappoint. Second, the exegetical handling of the text is brief, pointed, and full (336 pp.). Lieu demonstrates a keen awareness of the theological issues and firmly ground them in the text of the Johannine epistles. That said, more discussion surrounding textual issues would have been welcomed.

There is no shortage in sight when it comes to choosing a commentary on the Johannine Epistles, and I, II, & III John: A Commentary by Judith M. Lieu is an option well worth discovering. Lieu is both clear and to-the-point in her exegesis, and her presentation is helpfully critical in an approach will compliment other available options. While I don’t see this volume superseding Marshall (1978), Smalley (1984), or Kruse (2000) in usefulness, I do see it being positioned as one of the better, more recent examinations of the Johannine Epistles from a critical perspective. It comes highly recommended!

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Review: I & II Timothy and Titus (NTL)

14876101Raymond F. Collins is a Catholic priest of the Diocese of Providence and Professor Emeritus of New Testament at the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC. Collins has authored numerous books, including several New Testament commentaries, such as First Corinthians in the Sacra Pagina series (2007) and Second Corinthians in the Paideia Commentaries on the New Testament series (2013). Collins has written broadly in the field of New Testament and Pauline Studies, and thus the present commentary on the Pastoral Epistles is situated firmly within his academic wheelhouse.

As part of the highly acclaimed New Testament Library series, indeed the inaugural volume of the series, I & II Timothy and Titus: A Commentary is exemplar in almost every respect. Collins opens with a brief introduction to the Pastoral Epistles before treating each epistle individually. Unsurprisingly, Collins assumes the so-called “scholarly consensus” concerning the authorship of the epistles as occurring sometime after the death of Paul. Thus, for Collins, the composition of the Pastoral Epistles is pseudepigraphical in nature and the author is appropriately designated by the title “the Pastor.” Those that touchdown outside of this critical consensus concerning the Pauline authorship will appreciate Collins’ survey of the issue, but likely find his conclusions lacking in argumentative substance. Collins likewise discusses the nature of the Pastorals and their difference from other epistles, the literary from of the epistles, etc. Again, the introduction is brief, but Collins does well to cover some of the necessary grounds.

The commentary proper handles each epistle individually and includes a condensed introduction on each epistle, an outline of the content, and the treatment of the text. Collins has also included ten excursus sections scattered throughout the volume. The excursus sections cover topics such as Christians in the world, faith, church order, the Pastor’s perspective on women, etc. Much of Collins’ treatment is flavored with a reliance upon an underlying presence of Hellenistic motifs within the Pastorals. This is brought out several times in the commentary, including the notorious passage on women in 1 Timothy 2:9-15. Collins approach is unique, and the reader will likely benefit from the vantage point that he presents. However, one of the more disappointing aspects of the volume is the lack of an author translation (NRSV is used) and the accompanied textual notes that are present in the subsequent volumes of the series. This is particularly evident with passages such as Titus 2:13, which typically should have provided an alternative translation and commentary around the reasoning of such. Both are unfortunately lacking here.

I & II Timothy and Titus: A Commentary by Raymond F. Collins is an excellent commentary. It provides a clear and consistent treatment of the Pastorals from a critical, Catholic perspective. In any case, the reader should appreciate Collins’ approach, as it will compliment other volumes on the Pastorals extremely well. I don’t see this volume replacing Mounce (2000), Knight (1992), or Towner (2006), but it is certainly worth the investment for those interested in the Pastorals, It comes highly recommended!

Review: Theology of Work Commentary Series

screen-shot-2016-09-12-at-9-41-23-pmWe spend more time working than all other activities combined. Work is an essential component of daily life and paramount to our identity as individuals created in the image of God. Still, there appear to be few things more problematic to reconcile with the Christian life than work. Why is there such a vast chasm standing between work and faith? How should faith and work connect and be nurtured within the Christian life? What does the Bible say about work and how should it influence and shape the way Christians work? These are the sort of questions that have motivated the existence of the Theology of Work Project, and propelled the development of a truly unique and valuable collaborative effort.

Theology of Work Bible Commentary is the shared fruit of both seasoned biblical scholarship and professional insight. Some of the more noteworthy contributors include Daniel I. Block, Duane A. Garrett, Jonathan T. Pennington, Bruce Waltke, and more. Still, the most unique aspect of this commentary is discovered in the wider roster of individuals involved. The Theology of Work Project brought together a team of leading executives from various professions, ministry leaders, and biblical scholars, and then tasked them with the responsibility of exploring the whole Bible and building a bridge between the workplace and the Christian life. The result was a one of a kind commentary that systematically pointed the reader towards the joy and responsibility of work as worship to God.

There is much to be praised about the Theology of Work Bible Commentary. It is both scholarly and in-depth while being accessible and immediately applicable to readers of all backgrounds. In fact, the practical nature of this commentary is the most praiseworthy feature to be enjoyed by all readers—in particular for the working pastors and the ordinary working Christians. The editorial team has done the readers a tremendous service by removing layers of scholarly jargon without compromising the scholarship within, and thus producing a commentary that is useful for all with a substance that will last. Each section of the commentary is easily digestible and examined within larger units of the biblical book.

I was shocked to discover how much the Bible had to say about the nature and function of ordinary work. It is true that work consumes the majority of our daily lives, and yet, our faith is the foundation from which we are called to operate therein. In other words, work and faith are not mutually exclusive, but rather should be understood as a unified framework with which we are to view the world. That is, our faith demonstrates itself most clearly in the work we do! The overarching heartbeat of this reality is traceable from Genesis to Revelation, but the Theology of Work Bible Commentary offers more than an explanation of this truth. The reader will discover clear and practical examples of how a proper theology of work can function to bridge a gap that is far too often avoided.

Theology of Work Bible Commentary is a unique resource that provides valuable insight and practical guidance into the function and role of work in the Christian life. From Genesis to Revelation, the reader will be encouraged and empowered to both embrace and rejoice in the God-given responsibility of work. Human beings have been commissioned by God to exercise dominion over the earth, and to be fruitful and multiply. God has commanded those created in his image to operate as people with a clear and identifiable theology of work. It should be deeply ingrained into the very fabric of our being. This is a whole Bible commentary that will quickly turn that command into reality as the readers’ eyes are opened to the significance of work as a mode of worship and service in the Christian life. This is a must have series for every pastor looking to encourage his congregation to live beyond Sunday. It comes highly recommended!!

 

I received a review copy of this series in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Review: Destroyer of the gods

29894928Larry W. Hurtado is Emeritus Professor of New Testament Language, Literature and Theology in the School of Divinity at the University of Edinburgh. Hurtado has authored numerous books related to early Christianity, including Lord Jesus Christ: Devotion to Jesus in Earliest Christianity and The Earliest Christian Artifacts: Manuscripts and Christian Origins. Most recently, Hurtado has written a blockbuster of a book and thought-provoking investigation into the distinctiveness of early Christianity within the Greco-Roman context.

Destroyer of the gods: Early Christian Distinctiveness in the Roman World is an important and well-thought monograph that explores various aspects of the early Christian movement. The goal of the book is to display the uniqueness of early Christianity in the vast religious landscape of the Greco-Roman world. The book begins with a quick survey of early Christianity through the lenses of non-Christians, including both Jewish and Pagan critiques of Christians. Hurtado concludes, “a good many outsiders, who were the overwhelming majority of the populace, regarded Christians and Christianity as objectionably different and certainly not simply one group among an undifferentiated lot” (p. 35). It is this discovery that establishes the subsequent chapters as the reader is guided through the distinctiveness of early Christian ethics, worship, and more.

The entire book is fascinating and chocked full of rich historical commentary on the Christian movement of the second century. However, one of the most exciting chapters in the book has to do with the early Christian interest with the written word. That is, according to Hurtado, the early Christian movement was particularly interested in books—a “bookish” religion. The implications of this fly in the face of the popular misnomer that early Christians were primarily concerned with oral tradition rather than written words. Early Christianity, according to Hurtado, was uniquely fond of reading, writing, copying, and circulating text. In fact, the modern book likely discovers its origins in the early Christian utilization of the codex. Thus, Hurtado concludes, “the young Christian movement [was] distinctively text oriented in context of the varied religious environment of that time . . . ‘textuality’ was central, and, from the outset, early Christianity was, indeed, ‘a bookish religion’” (p. 141).

Destroyer of the gods: Early Christian Distinctiveness in the Roman World by Larry W. Hurtado is a worthwhile investment for anyone interested in early Christianity. Hurtado is usually lucid in his presentation, but this book easily tops the charts of Hurtado’s life works. The reader will likely appreciate Hurtado’s interaction with contemporary scholarship and sensitivity to make the subject matter accessible to a wide range of readership. While much more could surely be said about Hurtado’s treatment of early Christian ethics and worship, in my opinion, the chapter outlined above is alone worth the price of the book. It comes highly recommended!

 

I received a review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

 

Review:NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible

27840547Properly understanding the context of a historical document such as the Bible is necessary to unlock a meaning that leads to application. Context changes everything in the arena of biblical interpretation and it is near impossible to do serious study of the Bible without a sufficient understanding of the context. As is frequently repeated, the golden rule of biblical interpretation is “context, context, context.” It is here that the recently released NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible edited by John H. Walton and Craig S. Keener provides a much needed resource for pastors, students, and laity.

The NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible is both beautifully illustrated and rich with content. The full-color layout immerses the reader into the Bible like never before. There are plenty of high-quality photographs and illustrations throughout, as well as numerous maps, charts, and diagrams. Still, one of the most fascinating aspects of this Study Bible is the extent to which the publisher has sought to bring the reader into the cultural background beyond mere written content. The reader will encounter extensive high-resolution photographs of various artifacts, written documents, biblical manuscripts, and more. The experience of the Study Bible alone is well worth the cover price. It is truly as close to a total immersion into the biblical world as many readers will get in this lifetime.

As the title suggests, the NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible is based on the updated 2011 NIV translation. The content of the study notes are above expectation. First, and probably foremost, the sheer amount of notes packed into this Study Bible is amazing—much, much more than a typical niche Study Bible. In fact, I would say the amount of notes is similar in number to that of any of the major Study Bibles released in recent years. Moreover, throughout the NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible there are various sidebar topical discussions on cultural themes that arise with each book of the Old Testament and the New. These discussions vary in length—from a paragraph to a couple pages—and cover a ton of important subjects. For example, in Genesis the reader will discover conversation surrounding the historical setting of Genesis, ziggurats, cosmic history and mythology, patriarchal religion, covenant, and much more. Almost every other page has a significant entry relevant to the culture and background of a given book of the Bible.

There is much to be celebrated about the NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible. As stated above, I think that one of the most impressive aspects of this volume is the intentionality to bring the reader into the biblical world. The combination of visual and written content is paired with a unified mission like no other Study Bible I’ve ever seen or used. The closest comparison is the HCSB Study Bible, which succeeds in part visually, but lacks the depth of cultural interaction and content seen here. I also found the layout and organization of the Bible to be incredibly useful and well-executed. There is a ton of content on every page, but reading through it doesn’t feel as cumbersome as one might think. It is visually pleasing and the print quality is excellent. The font may be difficult for aged-eyes, especially in the study notes, but the print quality itself is akin to all previous Zondervan full-color Study Bible publications. It is currently available in hardcover, Italian duo-tone imitation leather, and black bonded leather. Premium ebony leather would be preferred (specifically the same build and quality of the Zondervan NIV Study Bible), but the options available at this time are more than sufficient.

The newly released and highly anticipated NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible edited by John H. Walton and Craig S. Keener is a phenomenal resource and deserves a spot on the shelf of all serious students of the Bible. This is a resource that will be consulted often and be used for many years to come. It is a resource that will drag the reader into the biblical world and illuminate the text like never before. If you are looking for a Study Bible that will uniquely compliment others in your library, the NIV Cultural Backgrounds Study Bible is one that could not be recommended more. It’s an instant classic that will quickly make its way to the top of your most used resources list. It comes highly recommended!

 

I received a review copy of this book in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Review: The Complete Jewish Study Bible

29844595The number of Study Bibles available on the market today is breathtaking. There seems to be a Study Bible themed for almost any occasion or reason one could imagine. In recent years, several major Study Bible projects surfaced and released with mixed reception. One of the latest additions to this Study Bible market, and one that promises a wealth of useful insight into the Scriptures is the newly published The Complete Jewish Study Bible (CJSB).

The CJSB is a unique Study Bible experience that seeks to submerge the reader into the Jewishness of both Testaments through fresh and relevant study notes and articles selected to accomplish this mission. The CJSB is based on the widely used Complete Jewish Bible (CJB) by David A. Stern. Those familiar with the CJB will know what to expect. Stern has translated the Bible with a particular sensitivity to the Jewish tradition and thus has retained Jewish names and words with theological significance. For example, the reader will discover thousands of occurrences in both the Old and New Testament of Adonai where the Hebrew and Greek would not warrant such translation, but the Hebraic tradition would (xlii-xliii). Readers will surely have a personal preference and opinion towards this decision and others like it, and further comment is beyond the scope of this review.

The CJSB prepares the reader for “extensive bottom-of-page study notes to help readers understand the deeper meanings behind the Jewish text” (xix). However, for most readers (and especially those familiar with other Study Bibles on the market) this statement will over promise and under deliver. Many pages lack any presence of study notes. The notes are certainly helpful and useful for understanding the deeper meaning of the text, but they are not “extensive” by any meaningful definition of the word. I do not say this to discourage the reader away from the benefit of the CJSB, but rather to prepare them for the content therein. Still, the benefit of the CJSB is found in the numerous, and I mean numerous topical and themed articles. The topical articles cover a wide range of topics in both the Old Testament and the New, including the nature of covenant, millennialism and the future Israel, Satan in Jewish thought, a Jewish understanding of Hell, and much, much more. The themed articles are abundant and sorted under twelve major themes: (1) anti-Jewish scriptural interpretation, (2) covenants, (3) Jewish customs, (4) Jewish-Gentile relations, (5) messianic prophecy, (6) the names of God, (7) Sabbath, (8) salvation and atonement, (9) the holy days of Israel, (10) the land of Israel, (11) Torah, and (12) the tabernacle. The CJSB opens with a lengthy introduction the CJB and closes with a number of appendix material (e.g. glossary of Hebrew words, topical and theme article index, biographies of rabbis and sages, etc.) and eight full-color maps.

The CJSB is a unique Study Bible and a valuable investment for anyone interested in better understanding the Jewishness of the Old and New Testament. The articles are useful and many, and the CJB is an excellent supplemental translation to your Bible of choice. However, while I was honestly pleased by content that the CJSB offered, for some reason, I continued to feel as though something was missing. It could be the lack of “extensive” notes that I was anticipating or that they were paired with the CJB—a supplemental translation choice, in my honest opinion. Despite this, I was surprised at how often I was reaching for the CJSB to see what the contributors had to say about a passage or topic and I was pleased by the content and number of articles.

The Complete Jewish Study Bible is a welcomed addition to the Study Bible market. The CJSB offers an unparalleled experience that will truly enrich the reader’s understanding of the Scriptures. If anything, I think that it is safe to assume that the CJSB will provide another perspective for the reader to weigh as they seek to resemble and serve Jesus in the twenty-first century. I said it before, and I will say it again, the CJSB is a unique Study Bible and a valuable investment for anyone interested in better understanding the Jewishness of the Old and New Testament. It deserves a place on the shelf of every Christian!

 

I received a review copy of this book in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Review: The Cradle, the Cross, and the Crown (2nd ed.)

27777608The Cradle, the Cross, and the Crown: An Introduction to the New Testament by Andreas J. Köstenberger, L. Scott Kellum, and Charles L. Quarles has been a go-to resource in my study of the New Testament for over a year now. I can’t count the number of times this book has been off my shelf. It’s comprehensive, user-friendly, up-to-date, evenhandedly conservative, and so much more. Now, recently released in an updated and revised second edition, The Cradle, the Cross, and the Crown has further established itself as one of the best New Testament introductions on the market.

The second edition of The Cradle, the Cross, and the Crown retains everything the reader came to know and love about the first edition, including learning objectives for different levels of study, chapter review questions, recommended bibliographies, and more. What has changed is reflected in the addition of nearly 200 pages. The second edition has received significant updates to the bibliographies and footnotes, maps, charts, as well as the addition of interpretation sections to better facilitate understanding of the various literary genres in the New Testament. Also, there is now an epilogue to the book that is devoted to the storyline of Scripture—a welcome addition to an already complete introductory treatment of the New Testament.

One of the most appealing aspects of this volume is the intentionality with which the authors have sought to cultivate a balanced approach towards spiritual and intellectual growth. The authors not only immerse the reader into the intellectual dialog of New Testament studies, but they equally teach the reader how to interact with the New Testament and demonstrate how a properly understanding the New Testament (especially its placement and impact within the whole of the biblical narrative as shown in the epilogue of the second edition) refines the Christian life. There is no attempt among the authors to sidestep the difficult issues of New Testament studies, and there is likewise no desire to see the New Testament become a mere academic pursuit. This level of intentionality was certainly present in the first edition, but it is even more so representative in the second.

The Cradle, the Cross, and the Crown: An Introduction to the New Testament by Andreas J. Köstenberger, L. Scott Kellum, and Charles L. Quarles was an immediate standard when it was originally published in 2009. This second edition only builds upon the legacy of the first, and the outcome is deserving of much praise. I would make room (its big, so you will need to make a lot of room) for this volume whether you own the first edition or not. This is a New Testament introduction that deserves shelf space for any serious student of the New Testament. It comes highly recommended!!

 

I received a review copy of this book in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Review: Ephesians (EGGNT)

27777748Benjamin L. Merkle is Associate Professor of New Testament and Greek at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Apart from writing numerous published articles, Merkle has authored several books and co-authored the recently released and highly acclaimed Going Deeper with New Testament Greek: A Intermediate Study of the Grammar, Syntax, and Exegesis of the New Testament (with Andreas J. Köstenberger and Robert L. Plummer). Still, most recently, Merkle has contributed the newest volume to the growing and increasingly useful Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament (EGGNT) series.

This volume on Ephesians, much like the existing EGGNT volumes, is structured to optimize the reader’s understanding of the Greek text and facilitate a deeper recognition of the various nuances therein. Merkle begins with a brief introduction to the epistle that helpfully establishes the primry building blocks of the letter. However, while those interested in a fuller treatment of introductory issues will need to look elsewhere, Merkle offers enough information to get the reader properly acquainted with the epistle. I was especially surprised and appreciative of Merkle’s conversation surrounding the original recipients of the letter. Those who are familiar with the letter to the Ephesians should know the debate about the recipients and the textual variant in 1:1. Merkle affirms “in Ephesus” as the original reading for the recipients and provides some valid textual reasons for doing such.

The organization of the volume is arranged around a phrase-by-phrase analysis of the Greek text. Merkle provides extensive conversation concerning grammar, syntax, word usage, textual variants, and almost anything else exegetically significant to the text. The content requires a working knowledge of Greek, but Merkle is clear and careful when communicating technical concepts. Another useful feature of this volume is the Greek sentence diagraming that is offered at the beginning of each major section of text. This is helpful for quickly visualizing how the text joints together to establish Paul’s point. Each major section likewise concludes with a “For Further Study” section that takes various themes unearthed in the section and provides the reader with a bibliography for additional investigation. Lastly, Merkle has provided recommended preaching outlines that allow the reader to work from the text established in the volume to the sermon preached in the pulpit.

There is much to be praised about this volume. First, and probably foremost, Merkle is very well acquainted with the letter to the Ephesians and his sensitivity to the broader academic conversation concerning textual issues and grammatical debate is noticeable. Second, I found Merkle to be extremely thoughtful in his explanation of difficult concepts. He is clearly aware of his primary audience and knows that a variegated knowledge of the Greek language is found therein. This is beneficial for the pastors or students who are less frequently working out of the Greek text but have some formal training or exposure. Third, the scope of this volume’s content is impressive given its small footprint. Merkle has crammed a lot of relevant and useful information into a small package. In fact, I am confident to say that if you pair this volume with any of the recommended commentaries, you will be well equipped to preach or teach through the letter of Ephesians with excellence.

Ephesians: Exegetical Guide to the Greek New Testament by Benjamin L. Merkle is an exciting addition to an already exhilarating series. Merkle’s contribution fits extremely well with the quality and caliber that the EGGNT series has already produced, and I think that any serious student of the Bible would be ill-equipped without it. If you have been looking for a resource that will guide you through the depths of Paul’s letter to the Ephesians, then look no further, because this will continually be your first stop on that journey. It comes highly recommended!

 

I received a review copy of this books in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Review: The Mind of the Spirit

27066913The Mind of the Spirit: Paul’s Approach to Transformed Thinking by Craig S. Keener is both dense with detail and saturated with a familiarity of the Greco-Roman world. This isn’t a book for the faint of heart, but the payoff is well worth the journey. Keener seeks to provide a contrast between the corrupted mind and the transformed mind, not by providing a long list of rules and regulations, but rather by presenting various windows into a new reality (p. 253).

Transformed thinking (or the renewing of mind) is the result of embodying the mindset of Christ and contemplating the things of God. This reality, according to Keener, is a continual and daily undertaking for the believer. Keener explains, “Walking by the Spirit rather than by the flesh requires a continuing, deliberate rethinking and retuning, with many determined decisions to believe God’s truth about our identity, until our brain is rewired enough that the new way becomes the more prevalent way” (p.263). Thus, the renewing of the mind is actualized by regular and predictable patterns of thought and reflection upon the things of Christ.

While this is a necessary task for the believer, and one aided by the transforming power of the gospel and the work of the Holy Spirit, it is likewise an increasingly difficult task. There exists today a tension in this world (and churches) that seems to negate the need for a transformed mind in the life of the believer. Keener rightly reminds the reader that despite the overwhelming joy of a life governed by the transformed mind of the Spirit, such is by no means an escape from the realities of the tension and conflict in this life (p. 258). That is, for Keener, taking up the mind of the Spirit is a daily endeavor that takes discipline and determination despite the world around us.

The aim of The Mind of the Spirit is admirable and Keener has accomplished his purpose therein with much to be praised. Keener’s expertise in the background literature of the New Testament and his deep-seated longing to see the people of God flourish in all that God has for them in this life is contagious. This is a much needed subject of discussion that has, until now received very little serious and scholarly attention. The reader will appreciate the clarity and conviction that Keener has brought to the table, and leave encouraged knowing that such transformation is available today—indeed, available now! This is a book that will be read across Christian disciplines for many years to come. It comes highly recommended!!

 

I received a review copy of this books in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.