Review: Hidden But Now Revealed

9780830827183G.K. Beale is known for his unique ability to examine and synthesize biblical themes across canonical lines. He has published numerous volumes focused on biblical theology and the use of the Old Testament in the New. However, the present volume co-authored with Benjamin L. Gladd, Hidden But Now Revealed: A Biblical Theology of Mystery rightly positions itself as one of the more unique works in the growing corpus of Beale’s thematic explorations.  

Hidden But Now Revealed opens with an imperative first chapter. It is here that Beale and Gladd firmly establish the roots of the theme of mystery in the book of Daniel—specifically Daniel 2 and 4, although, as the reader will see, the theme is found elsewhere in Daniel as well (Daniel 5, 7-12). Thus, Daniel becomes a type of thematic launchpad with which Beale and Gladd inaugurate nearly all subsequent usages or allusions of the biblical theme of mystery.

Beale and Gladd describe a revelation of a mystery as, “God fully disclosing wisdom about end-times events that are mostly hitherto unknown . . . [it] signals the hidden nature of revelation and its subsequent interpretation” (p. 46). In other words, a mystery was once partially hidden in one form or another but has now been more fully revealed. Consequently, while there may be cases of revealed mystery in the Old Testament, the majority of the investigation inevitably rests in the New.

As the book unfolds, Beale and Gladd guide the reader through early Judaism and into the writings of the New Testament. The reader is accompanied in a carefully and detailed investigation of every occurrence of mystery from Matthew to Revelation, and then challenged to see the whole picture in light of that established in the first chapter. Apart from the content of each of the chapters, Beale and Gladd provide a number of related excursus materials to launch further insight.

I opened this review alluding to the fact that this was one of the more unique works that I have read by Beale. This is not because there is anything uncharacteristic about the book that one would not expect from Beale, quite the opposite. Rather, it displays Beale’s unique ability to observe the whole of Scripture in relation to the various parts more than some of his other works. Beale has taken a seemingly mysterious (pun intended) biblical theme, displayed the interconnectedness between the Old Testament and the New, and carefully guided the reader to the practical end of understanding and application.

The usefulness of biblical theology to the ongoing interdisciplinary interaction between the fields of biblical studies, theology, and hermeneutics is undeniable. While there is certainly a number of difficulties that will inevitably arise when trying to synthesize a single theme across the biblical canon, the profit of such pursuit will always outweigh the loss. Still, the insights to be unearthed from this book are numerous, and Beale and Gladd provide unparalleled guidance therein.

If you are in the market for a comprehensive journey into the biblical theme of mystery and its implications on the Christian life, you will not find anything better on the shelf than Hidden But Now Revealed: A Biblical Theology of Mystery by G. K. Beale and Benjamin L. Gladd. It is rich with interpretive insight and deep in practical significance, and thus comes highly recommended!

 

I received a review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

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Review: Unchanging Witness

28869720We are now witnessing a moral transformation before our own eyes. It is a cultural shift that continues to sweep the land, and it is the issue of same-sex marriage and homosexuality that stands at the forefront of this fast-moving revolution, and its agenda is being bolstered on nearly every street corner. Are Christians to assume that they have got it wrong all this time? Has tradition really misunderstood what appears to be the clear and consistent message of Scripture on these issues? In today’s increasingly post-Christian world it is imperative that such challenges are met with gentleness and love, and the Christian must be well-equipped to meet such tasks. It is here that S. Donald Fortson III and Rollin G. Grams have provided a unique and timely volume that aims to fill a much needed void amid an ever-changing world.

Unchanging Witness: The Consistent Christian Teaching on Homosexuality in Scripture and Tradition (B&H Academic, 2016) begins with a history of the Gay Christian movement in America—from the New York Stonewall Inn riots of 1969 to the publication and proclamation of the Boswell Thesis in the early 1980’s. This is an appropriate place to start the conversation for the reader. Not only does it provide a well-documented outline of events for where we are today, but it also helpfully places the conversation amid its proper historical context. This context then becomes an essential part of the initial section as the reader is guided through nearly two millennia of church history, beginning with the Church Fathers and ending with the current landscape of many modern mainline denominations. Fortson and Grams systematically dismantle the revisionist claims that characterize the Gay Christian movement, but it is the abundance of primary source material that carries the bulk of their argumentative weight.

With the historical foundation firmly established, Fortson and Grams can now direct the appropriate attention to the Scriptures that rightly motivated the previous convictions of the Christian Church. This section is divided into three parts: (1) The Bible and Homosexuality, (2) Creation and Law: Old Testament Text and Homosexuality, and (3) Creation, the Law and the Gospel: New Testament Text and Homosexuality—with the latter two parts comprising nearly half of the content of the book. There is no Scriptural concern that is left unturned as Fortson and Grams carefully guide the reader through the biblical passages, what the text says about homosexuality, how the text was understood historically and culturally, and how the text has been understood and interpreted by Christians (p. 2). The interaction with the major interpreters of the Gay Christian movement is ample, and the reader will benefit greatly from the level of scholarship and documentation provided therein.

The attention to scholarly detail in this volume is incredible. On a stylistic note, Fortson and Grams have chosen to utilize the New Revised Standard Version of the Bible because of the similar ecumenical intent of the volume and translation. Fortson and Grams have also provided a whole host of primary source material in the initial section of the book, and to make interaction easier for the reader they have used italics to highlight the portions of text that are most important. In regards to the content, it would be difficult to differentiate between the quality of work therein. Every chapter is equally important to the thesis of the book and the interaction with the Gay Christian movement is witnessed throughout. Nevertheless, some points of particular enjoyment will be the parallels presented between the law code text of Leviticus and Paul’s exhortation in 1 Corinthians 5-7 and the revisionist readings of Romans 1:24-28. Moreover, the assessment of the Pauline argument of nature/creation and nurture/law in Romans was also extremely helpful for interacting with some of the contemporary arguments against the traditional understanding of the texts. One major downfall of the volume is the lack of a bibliography. While skimming the footnotes is more work, and I am reluctant to recommend such, it will certainly prove beneficial for the interested reader.

Unchanging Witness: The Consistent Christian Teaching on Homosexuality in Scripture and Tradition by S. Donald Fortson III and Rollin G. Grams is easily projected to be one of the most important books of 2016. The comprehensive treatment of the issues at hand are presented in a clear and persuasive manner that only the most uninformed of readers would be willing to ignore. Of course, while continuing to play interpretive leapfrog with the biblical text may work in prolonging the conversation among supporters, the nearly two millennia of unchanging witness within the Christian community is not easily dismissed—at least not without severe logical and historical implications. The testimony of both Scripture and the response of the people of God to such have been unanimously opposed to the current revolutionary trend that is sweeping the nation, and Fortson and Grams have displayed this fact with undeniable precision. The Christian would do well in reading this book with careful and attentive eyes of compassion for the ever-changing world around them. It comes highly recommended!

 

I received a review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Review: Ruth (ZECOT)

9780310282983.jpg_2Daniel I. Block is a household name in the field of Old Testament studies. He is the Gunther H. Knoedler Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College where he has served for over a decade, and is author, co-author, and/or editor of numerous books, including the two-volume commentary on The Book of Ezekiel in the New International Commentary on the Old Testament series, Deuteronomy in the NIV Application Commentary series, Judges & Ruth in the New American Commentary series, and much more. Most recently, functioning as the general editor of the series and the author of this volume on Ruth, Block has produced a captivating analysis into the theological corners of one of the most important narratives of the Hebrew Bible.

Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the Old Testament: Ruth opens with an up-to-date selected bibliography of some the most important works related to the book of Ruth, as well as Block’s own translation of the Hebrew text. Block’s translation is exceptional. It was easy-to-read, faithful to the text, and true to the narratival genre as a whole. Following the translation, the reader will encounter a firmly situated introduction that addresses standard introductory matters, such as date, authorship, the providence of composition, major theological themes, style, structure, etc. The commentary proper is organized under six sections that guide the reader through the text: (1) The Main Idea of the Passage, (2) Literary Context, (3) Translation and Exegetical Outline, (4) Structure and Literary Form, (5) Explanation of the Text, (6) Canonical and Practical Significance. This format is extremely helpful in that it allows the reader to narrow in on the details of the text with a broader sense of the passage and book at large.

The high points of this commentary are overflowing. As mentioned above, the format and structure of the book is intentionally sensitive to the task of the end user. This means that the pastor and/or teacher will be more than pleased with the content and organization of the book as they seek to preach or teach through this important story. Block helpfully recognizes the importance of the narrative genre and does an excellent job bringing this feature to the surface throughout. For example, the outline of the book (p. 58) has been presented thematically as a type of narrative drama, and thus Block labels the sections and subsections accordingly (i.e. Act I, Act II, Act III, Act IV, Scene 1, Scene 2, Scene 3, etc.). Moreover, Block has also included a dramatized reading of the narrative to be used within an ecclesiastical setting, and thus mimic the original hearing of the story (p. 263). This narratival emphasis alone warrants a home for this volume on your bookshelf. I also found Block’s interaction with the text to be consistently helpful in recognizing the larger picture and significance of the book as a whole. Finally, it is worth mentioning, unlike the New Testament volumes in the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary series, this Old Testament volume include Hebrew and English in the presentation of the diagramed text. This is especially useful for those that know the original language, but those do may not will still find great benefit.

Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the Old Testament: Ruth by Daniel I. Block is, in many ways, representative of how a commentary should be executed if the end goal is to be the faithful proclamation of a biblical narrative. Block has intentionally brought together helpful features that are rarely found between a single binding, and has thus done an outstanding job guiding the reader on both a macro and micro level. Moreover, his consistent narratival emphasis allows the reader to remain focused on the broader picture being painted throughout the story, as well as the main theological themes therein. While the commentary is certainly detailed in exegetical riches, I am confident that even those with little or no understanding of the biblical languages will be able to use this volume with tremendous benefit. If you are preparing to preach or teach through the book of Ruth, or simply interested in a detailed investigation into this important biblical story, this will be a volume that you cannot afford to be without.

 

I received a review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Review: Dictionary of Daily Life in Biblical and Post-Biblical Antiquity

704602_1_ftcThe landscape of specialized biblical and theological dictionaries produces continual growth year-by-year. These dictionaries generally boast a more focused intention on content and tend to provide a more unique product as an end goal. The level of usefulness of these dictionaries can vary greatly depending on the academic or personal interest of the individual. However, because of the unique quality of such works the price-point is generally out of reach for the average consumer—especially for a multi-volume work like that being reviewed here. The intersection of such usefulness and availability is tellingly rare in this distinctive reference genre, and thus when it is clearly observed attention should be widely merited.

The Dictionary of Daily Life in Biblical and Post-Biblical Antiquity (DDL) edited by Edwin M. Yamauchi and Marvin R. Wilson is a recent multi-volume dictionary series that is certain to offer itself as a benefit to many. At present, two of the four projected volumes of DDL have been produced with the remaining two volumes set to be released by the end of 2016. DDL is one of those unique cases, like that mentioned above, where the usefulness and availability of the resource intersect at almost every point. The present two volumes are jam-packed with both valuable and vital information for understanding the biblical world, and the forthcoming volumes are likewise projected to benefit a wide array of readership. Furthermore, the sheer affordability of DDL should almost guarantee that the intentions of the contributors can be enjoyed by both scholar and laity alike.

DDL contains a number of important and unique articles related to the domestic life, technology, culture, laws, and religious practices of the ancient world. While other top-tier multi-volume dictionaries (Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary (AYBD), International Standard Encyclopedia of the Bible (ISBE), etc.) may make reference to similar topics as DDL, it would be incredibly rare to observe them interacting with the same level of detail as DDL, and certainly not in the same format. For example, volume one opens with a thorough article on abortion that is near twice the length of that found in AYBD. Moreover, it also closes with an equally thorough discussion on dancing that is nearly seven times the length of that found in ISBE—an article not even mentioned in AYBD. Other articles found in volume one include adoption, alcoholic beverages, banks and loans, beggars and alms, camels, childbirth and children, clothing, and much more.

706408_1_ftcVolume two likewise has a number of unique articles related to the everyday life of the ancient world. It opens with a 20-page article on death and afterlife and concludes with a 23-page article on human sacrifice. By comparison, ISBE has an article on human sacrifice that is roughly 3-pages, and AYBD doesn’t have a dedicated article at all. Other articles in volume two include divorce, dreams, education, eunuchs, hair, heating and lighting, and much more.

I found the highpoints of DDL to overflow with at least three major benefits. First, as displayed above, the scope and comprehensiveness of each of the articles are unique even among some of the other top-tier dictionaries. Thus, while other works may occasionally have similar articles as DDL, they are generally much briefer and narrower in scope than that offered in DDL. Second, the organization of each article cultivates a much broader comprehension of the subject that is being discussed. Each article opens with a brief summary, followed by six major sections: (1) The Old Testament, (2) The New Testament, (3) The Ancient New Eastern World, (4) The Greco-Roman World, (5) The Jewish World, and (6) The Christian World. Thus, DDL tends to trace the topic of discussion much further (approximately 2000 BC to AD 600) and across a broader scope of cultural boundaries. Third, each article concludes with a healthy and up-to-date bibliography that is intentionally curated to catapult the curious reader in the right direction—and this is something that is certain to awaken excitement in my fellow bibliography-enthusiasts.

The Dictionary of Daily Life in Biblical and Post-Biblical Antiquity is a phenomenal achievement in the field of biblical studies. Edwin M. Yamauchi and Marvin R. Wilson have helpfully gathered together some of the most important information about the ancient world and packaged it in such a way to make it accessible and understandable to the average reader. From the far-reaching scope of the articles to the comprehensive exploration therein, DDL is a useful and affordable resource that merits immediate attention from any serious students of the Bible. In fact, with the coming anticipation of the final two volumes appearing just over the horizon, I couldn’t think of a better reason to skip a few lattes to pick up the present two volumes today. Trust me, this is a resource you will want to consult often.

 

I received a review copy of these books in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Review: Grammar of the Greek New Testament

p.robea_.001bwA. T. Robertson’s magisterial volume on the grammar of the Greek New Testament has been utilized by teachers and students for over a century. Having been revised and expanded twice since it was initially released in 1914 (a second edition in 1915, and a third edition in 1919), A Grammar of the Greek New Testament in Light of Historical Research has firmly stood the test of time because of its comprehensive usefulness and approach to the New Testament language. The fact that Robertson’s work is today still widely recognized as one of the finest produced Greek grammars by nearly all of the experts in the field is an accomplishment of its own. Still, the real achievement here is discovered in the broad scope of the grammar itself.

First, at well over 1,400-pages, it may run the risk of being an understatement, but this volume is massive! The table of contents alone is over 40-pages, and the bibliography, while certainly outdated in many respects, is over 20-pages in length. Second, Roberson does more than provide the reader with a mere descriptive overview of the grammar of the Greek New Testament. Instead, Robertson endeavors to present the language of the New Testament in light of its development. This is a unique approach and requires a lot of groundwork to be laid, which Robertson accomplishes well in the nearly 150-page introduction and beyond. Therein, Robertson associates the language of the New Testament with the non-literary development of Koine Greek and various influences from the Semitic languages.

Robertson was a brilliant scholar, and the work that has gone into this volume is the unequivocal testimony to that very fact. If there is one thing that the reader will walk away with from this volume, apart from Robertson’s end goal of linguistic competence in the language of the New Testament, it is the wide-reaching knowledge and passion that Robertson displays for the New Testament and its language. As the grammar proper opens the reader is carefully escorted through mountains of explanation and examples, from word formation to declensions and the history of declensions, to syntax and figures of speech (a real high point of the volume). The volume closes with over 200-pages of index and appendix material, including additional notes and a thorough subject and Greek word index.

As an intermediate Greek student, I was able to follow along with Robertson well and found much of his observations and explanations insightful. With that said, this is an advanced grammar that is primarily going to benefit the specialists or advanced students. Of course, if you are (myself included) an intermediate student with aspirations of continuing education in the language, then Robertson is an appropriate resource to acquire. The high points in this volume are many, and I have already alluded to a few above, but for the sake of personal reflection, I really benefited from the second section of the book that dealt at length with the topic of accidence. Grasping Greek inflection is imperative to understanding the language in general, and Robertson has provided a thorough treatment of such. This section alone would be worth the investment of the book.

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Few grammars of the Greek New Testament have been as impactful to the present pursuit of the study of New Testament Greek as A Grammar of the Greek New Testament in Light of Historical Research by A. T. Robertson. While modern options are certainly available and may be more appealing to many readers, the significance of Robertson’s volume cannot be overlooked because of its publication date. With that said, this is definitely an advanced grammar of the Greek New Testament, but even intermediate Greek students (myself included as mentioned above) will have much to glean from Robertson—especially his ability to ground the grammar within its historical development. While this review might run the risk of being a mere overview of Robertson’s work because of its sheer size, the reader can be assured that this volume is a must-have reference work for any serious student of the Greek New Testament.

 

I received a review copy of this book in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Review: God Dwells Among Us

9780830844142God Dwells Among Us: Expanding Eden to the Ends of the Earth found its beginning in G. K. Beale’s earlier work The Temple and the Church’s Mission: A Biblical Theology of the Dwelling Place of God (IVP Academic, 2004). It is there that Beale develops a fuller exploration of the biblical themes of tabernacle and temple, “from Genesis to Revelation, exploring both the ancient Near Eastern and Second Temple Jewish view of the temple” (p. 7). Co-author Mitchell Kim subsequently developed the aim of Beale’s work into a seven-week sermon series preached at Living Water Alliance Church in Chicagoland. This material was further condensed and distilled into a conference seminar before later being adjusted and released in its present form.

God Dwells Among Us rightly recognizes that the purpose of mankind has always been mission oriented. God has created a people to reflect his presence, character, and image to the ends of the earth as the priests of his dwelling place. This purpose began in Eden, the first temple, and continues into the eschaton as God establishes his eschatological temple among us. God Dwells Among Us opens with three orienting chapters that position the reader within the overall notion of the book. It is here that Beale and Kim present Eden as a temple, with the intended mission of Adam and Eve being to reflect God’s presence to the ends of the earth. The first couple failed, sin entered into the equation, and the mission was reassigned to the Patriarchs and beyond. Beale and Kim then guide the reader through the Mosaic period and the tabernacle as the temporary dwelling place of God, the ministry of the Prophets and promised restoration of Eden, Jesus as the new temple in the gospels, the early Christians as the continuation of the mission to expand Eden to the ends of the earth, and the New Heavens and New Earth as the climax of the Edenic expansion.

The implications of the biblical theme of temple reach into nearly every corner of life in Christ. It is here that Beale and Kim conclude with two important chapters dedicated to the hermeneutical explanation and practical importance of the temple theme previously journeyed. While there is certainly a plethora of practical riches and explanation littered throughout the entirety of the book, it is here that Beale and Kim helpfully connect the dots to the reader by answering anticipated questions and founding the significance of the temple theme into the mission-oriented purpose of mankind. This is likely the most valuable aspect of the entire book. It brings the canonical journey of the temple theme to its necessary conclusion and provides the reader with a significant foundation with which to gaze upon God and his purpose in this world. But the temple theme isn’t presented without reference as though it the authors’ efforts were imaginary aspirations. Rather, the reader will encounter citation after citation, and I mean citation after citation of biblical references. It will be clear to the reader that Beale and Kim have done their homework, and to the benefit of the reader, they have clearly presented the fruits of such labor.

God Dwells Among Us: Expanding Eden to the Ends of the Earth by G. K. Beale and Mitchell Kim is a clear and persuasive exploration into one of the most important themes of biblical theology. Beale and Kim have effectively presented a practical and engaging vision of God’s covenantal purpose for mankind that is firmly positioned within the context of the entire canon. The practical significance of such will be enough to radically alter the way you read the Scriptures and understand the mission of God in this world. God Dwells Among Us has provided a clear example of biblical theology par excellence. I am confident that your head and heart will be connected in all their proper places. It comes highly recommended!

 

I received a review copy of this book in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Review: The Hermeneutical Spiral

9780830828265Well-established as the standard evangelical work in the field of biblical hermeneutics since first being published in 1991, The Hermeneutical Spiral: A Comprehensive Introduction to Biblical Interpretation by Grant R. Osborne has been revised and expanded to meet the changing needs of the next generation. New chapters on the Old Testament law and use of the Old Testament in the New have been added, and general revisions have been undertaken throughout the volume. While the original work was well-situated to provide the reader with a longstanding example of usefulness in its presentation, this revised and expanded edition proves itself to be a much more refined demonstration of scholarly and practical engagement with the biblical text.

The Hermeneutical Spiral is a massive volume boasting over 600-pages. Osborne appropriately begins the investigation with an introduction to situate the reader for the task ahead. It is here that Osborne rightly understands the task of hermeneutics as the means of accomplishing an ecclesiastical end. For Osborne, “the final goal of hermeneutics is not systematic theology but the sermon. The actual purpose of Scripture is not explanation but exposition, not description but proclamation” (p. 29). This proves to be more than a mere statement of conviction for Osborne, as the outline of the book will effectively bring the reader from the examination of the biblical text in their original languages to the homiletical execution of a Sunday morning sermon.

As The Hermeneutical Spiral unfolds, Osborne helpfully directs the attention of the reader to the biblical text. It is here that the reader is introduced to the importance of context, grammar, semantics, syntax, and historical and cultural backgrounds. This section is imperative to the task of biblical hermeneutics and Osborne does an excellent job at guiding the reader through each. A high point from this section was Osborne’s discussion on semantic fallacies, including the root fallacy, misuse of etymology, the one-meaning fallacy, and much more. The careful reader will know and understand the importance of this section well, as most modern pulpit crimes are the result of semantic negligence and the proclamation of semantic fallacies.

Next, Osborne directs the attention of the reader towards an analysis of the various biblical genres. For Osborne, “Genre functions as a valuable link between the text and the reader” (p. 182). It is here that the hermeneutical groundwork that was laid in the prior section is applied to specific types of literature—Old Testament Law, Narrative, Poetry, Wisdom, Prophecy, Apocalyptic, Parable, and Epistle. This section also concludes with a helpful chapter on the use of the Old Testament in the New. A high point in this section was Osborne’s discussion surrounding the genre of biblical narrative. Specifically, the various aspects use to study biblical narrative—source, form, redaction, and narrative criticism. The latter being among the most helpful.

Lastly, Osborne appropriately closes the volume with a section dedicated to the application of the hermeneutical investigation undertaken in the previous sections. It is here that the reader is able to identify and interact with three applicationary aspects of biblical exegesis—biblical theology, systematic theology, and homiletics. Each of the three applications are discussed in detail, and the connection to the previous sections is unmistakable. However, the clear high point of this section was Osborne’s interaction and application of hermeneutics to the task of homiletics—both contextualization and sermon delivery. Osborne effectively lands the plane after a 600-page round trip flight from biblical text to target audience.

The Hermeneutical Spiral: A Comprehensive Introduction to Biblical Interpretation by Grant R. Osborne is a massive volume that leaves no hermeneutical-stone unturned. Osborne recognizes the task of hermeneutics as the primary means of a homiletical end and rightly equips the reader to function out of this recognition. In other words, as the reader continues to move between text and context on the hermeneutical spiral, sound exegesis brings the reader closer and closer to the intended meaning of the text and its significance for today. While The Hermeneutical Spiral is likely more detailed than the average reader is looking to digest, Osborne has provided a volume that cannot be overlooked by any serious Student of the Bible, especially that of the Pastor or Teacher.

 

I received a review copy of this book in exchange for and honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.